Monthly Archives: November 2017

Poetry news

Well, Ive had two poems published recently which means that someone other than the folks at my writing workshop has actually approved of what I’ve written. For me, this is a big deal, because these journals didn’t know me, and they still took a chance on what I wrote. The first appeared in the September issue of Chantwood, a general literary journal that does not publish online. Therefore, if you want to read it, I will publish it again here in a short while. It’s called “Lizard Skin,” and was one of the first poems I wrote once I took up this pastime.

The second poem has just appeared in the last week, and it is called “New Day.” If you would like to read it, you can find it here. It has been published by the group at the University of Maine at Farmington that prints an annual version, The Sandy River Review, and publishes an ongoing stream of literary endeavors in The River. It is in the latter that my work appears. Items are chosen from The River to be published in the print version, but I will have to wait to hear if I’ve made that more select group!

I wrote this poem at a writing retreat put on by my workshop (free!) in October. This was the most marvelous writing experience I’ve had in my life. It was run by the eminent poet Baron Wormser, and if you haven’t read his work, I commend it to you strongly. I’ve been reading one of his newer books, Unidentified Sighing Objects, and I can’t say enough good things about it. His writing instruction spoke to me as I have never felt before and I owe everything in this poem to his tutelage. This is one of the joys in belonging to a writers workshop (also free) that supports writers so excellently.

I am now in the publishing rat race, as I like to call it. I submit poems to journals that I discover through Duotrope, a wonderful service that lists over 6,000 journals with links to their websites and statistics regarding their publication practices. As the most disorganized person on the face of the earth (you should see my desk–I haven’t, for many weeks), it is nice to have a reputable third party to keep track of my scribblings and where I’ve sent them. The cost is $5 a month, much less than a house cleaning, and well worth the peace of mind it gives me. I have poems that are waiting review at some journals that I haven’t even looked at in six months, as newer poems get sent out to new journals. It’s a form of timeline of my writing, something it never occurred to me I might like.

I hope to be able to report further forays into the world of published writers in the future, but I wouldn’t hold my breath if I were you. Please remember that for me, hope springs eternal, and I will keep at it, at least a little longer.